The Times-Independent
MOAB WEATHER

Boulder artist wins Best in Show at ArTTrails

Array of new sculptures installed in downtown Moab

Artist Sue Quinlan of Boulder, Colorado won Best in Show at Saturday’s Fourth Annual Moab ArTTrails Sculpture Exhibition for her piece, Inclusion, now on display at the corner of Main and Center streets next to Pasta Jay’s.

Sue Quinlan discusses Inclusion, her sculpture in front of Pasta Jay’s, which won “Best in Show” at Saturday’s Fourth Annual Moab ArTTrails art walk. Photos by Doug McMurdo

Co-founders Michael Ford Dunton and Christy Williams Dunton spent Saturday morning with a host of volunteers taking down the sculptures that have graced downtown for the past year and installing the 2021 edition.

Quinlan’s piece was one of two the artist contributed to the event. Residents have plenty of time to vote on the People’s Choice award, which will be added to the permanent public collection. Voting ends Aug. 31. Log on to moabarttrails.org to vote.

Michael Ford Dunton explains the thought that went into Inseparable, Saturday during the Fourth Annual Moab ArTTrail’s art walk. Dunton is a cofounder.

The exhibition “was a tremendous joy to install and celebrate with the artists and the community,” said Williams Dunton on her Facebook page.

The Duntons, volunteers, artists and a couple dozen Moabites and visitors tagged along for a stroll from the Moab Arts and Recreation Center on 100 North, west across Highway 191 to 100 West, and then south to Center Street before heading east, stopping at various installations along the route.

Artist Pavia Justinian, top, looks through a hole in her sculpture, Untitled, which she created with fellow artist Dave Davis, both of Fruita, Colorado. Justinian offered an emotional homage to Davis, who died shortly after the piece was finished. “We used to stare through this hole at each other and smile,” she said.

Here’s what you’ll see when you “hike” the Moab ArTTrails. Across the street from the MARC stands Awareness, by sculptor Nathan Brimhall of West Jordan. It is valued at $12,000. Next is, Existence Totem, by Leadville, Colorado artist Kevins Shaffer, located in front of the Trailhead Public House on 100 North at Main; $6,500. No. 3 on the tour is Desert Trumpet, on 100 North in front of Moab Coffee Roasters, by sculptor Reven Marie Swanson of Denver, $18,000; Untitled, on 100 North west of the food court, Pavia Justinian and the late Dave Davis, Fruita, Colorado; $60,000; The Rift, in front of Hoo Doo Moab on 100 West, by Ted Schaal of Loveland, Colorado; $10,500; Overcoming, on West Center near the entrance to the City of Moab parking lot, by Deveran Farley of Lindon; $8,900; Serpent Weaver, by Mel Whitcomb of Littleton, Colorado, $15,000; Quinlan’s Inclusion can be observed outside of Pasta Jay’s, $12,500; Michael Ford Dunton’s own creation, Inseparable, is on East Center in front of the Moab Information Center, $60,000; Consciousness Rising, another contribution from South Jordan artist Nathan Brimhall, is in front of Bank of America; $15,000; Quinlan’s second piece, Continuum, is located on East Center and 100 East, $5,600. Two more pieces will be installed later to bring the total to 13. Those artists had to cancel due to COVID-19.

Mel Whitcomb discusses “Serpent Waver,” her rock sculpture. If there were an award for presentation, she would have won hands down after offering a hilarious and revealing story about her process. “I’m a middle school teacher,” she said later. “You have to know how to get them to pay attention.”

Contact Moab ArTTrails at 435-259-2709 or email at moabarttrails.org‘ target info@moabarttrails.org for purchase information.