business
Local realtors present grant to Community Rebuilds
The South Eastern Utah Association of Realtors recently presented a $500 grant to Community Rebuilds of Moab. The grant, which was awarded through the organization’s Housing Opportunity Fund (UARHO...
Nov 19, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 59 59 recommendations | email to a friend
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Grand County Credit Union looking to open Green River location soon
Ever since Key Bank closed its branch in Green River in June, residents of that community have been left without a financial institution. But the Grand County Credit Union (GCCU) will soon be allev...
Nov 06, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 353 353 recommendations | email to a friend
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Local doctor donates vasectomy fees to non-profit groups
A local physician has contributed approximately $15,000 to local charities by collecting donations from the recipients of no-scalpel vasectomies performed at his Moab clinic. Through his program, D...
Oct 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1246 1246 recommendations | email to a friend
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New guide service aims to fill gap in backcountry offerings
A new backcountry guide service that specializes in custom journeys for small groups and families has opened in Moab. Deep Desert Expeditions, founded by Moab resident Mike Coronella, aims to fill ...
Aug 05, 2010 | 0 0 comments | 1272 1272 recommendations | email to a friend
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  • Second Lives: Sara Melnicoff
    by Charli Engelhorn
    staff writer
    07.12.12 - 10:29 am

  • <b><i>Nature Conservancy goes solar... <br></b></i>
Gabe Stephens and Jason Gerding of Gardner-Energy install solar panels on the office roof of The Nature Conservancy’s Moab project office, 820 Kane Creek Blvd. The office recently transitioned from electric to solar power with the installation of the panels on Nov. 24. The project was made possible by a donation, according to a news release from The Nature Conservancy, who added that the conservation organization is “working to incorporate green initiatives in its everyday business, and contribute to reducing the impacts of climate change in the process.” Conservancy officials said that installing solar panels on some of the group’s properties will help lower the organization’s carbon footprint and offset costs. Officials estimated that the energy generated by the 28 260-watt panels will offset an estimated 19,000 pounds of carbon and help the organization trim an estimated $1,200 from its annual energy bill. The Moab solar project is the first of four that will be implemented by the Conservancy over the next year.
    Nature Conservancy goes solar...
    Gabe Stephens and Jason Gerding of Gardner-Energy install solar panels on the office roof of The Nature Conservancy’s Moab project office, 820 Kane Creek Blvd. The office recently transitioned from electric to solar power with the installation of the panels on Nov. 24. The project was made possible by a donation, according to a news release from The Nature Conservancy, who added that the conservation organization is “working to incorporate green initiatives in its everyday business, and contribute to reducing the impacts of climate change in the process.” Conservancy officials said that installing solar panels on some of the group’s properties will help lower the organization’s carbon footprint and offset costs. Officials estimated that the energy generated by the 28 260-watt panels will offset an estimated 19,000 pounds of carbon and help the organization trim an estimated $1,200 from its annual energy bill. The Moab solar project is the first of four that will be implemented by the Conservancy over the next year.
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    national news

    Traders work with a floor official on the floor of the NYSEAt its lowest on Thursday, the Nasdaq was 19.34 percent lower than its peak closing high on July 20, and about 35 points shy of being confirmed in bear territory. The S&P financial sector , already the worst performer among the 10 major sectors on the index, led the rout with a 3.23 percent decline, its steepest drop since Sept. 1. The rout in financial stocks is being led by banks as investors fear that the negative interest rates employed by a growing band of central banks to spur economic growth is now part of the problem rather than the solution.


    2016-02-11 12:52:41 -0700

    A man looks at a screen displaying news of markets update inside the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) building in MumbaiGlobal stock markets are on their shakiest footing in years. Investors are fleeing stocks and running to safe-havens like bonds and gold, driven by concerns about economic growth the effectiveness of central banks' policies. At the same time, tumbling energy prices are upending the economies of oil-producing countries, further slicing into global economic growth.


    2016-02-11 11:28:47 -0700

    U.S. Federal Reserve Board Chair Yellen testifies at the House Financial Services Committee in WashingtonBy Lindsay Dunsmuir and Jonathan Spicer WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen returned to Congress with a brave face on Thursday amid a worsening meltdown in global markets and growing skepticism the U.S. central bank can carry out its long-planned pivot to "normal" monetary policy. Testifying for a second straight day before lawmakers, Yellen repeatedly stressed that the Fed is not on a "pre-set path" even though, for now, she still expects it to gradually raise interest rates this year, given the strong U.S. labor market and other bright spots in the economy. With investors stampeding to safer assets globally, the head of the world's most influential central bank acknowledged that a weakened global economy and a steep slide in stock markets was tightening financial conditions faster than the Fed wants.


    2016-02-11 12:13:28 -0700