Fruits and veggies pack a potassium punch [Infographic]
by Brandpoint (ARA) Sponsored Content
May 13, 2013 | 16828 views | 0 0 comments | 220 220 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Potassium is an essential nutrient in the American diet. It’s also a nutrient that most people don’t get enough of – so much so that it was identified as a nutrient of concern in the USDA’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines. In fact, concern has reached international levels as the World Health Organization recently released its first ever recommendation for potassium intake citing overwhelming evidence that increasing potassium intake (along with decreasing sodium intake) can lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and coronary heart disease. Currently, just 3 percent of the U.S. population is meeting the U.S. recommended intake for potassium of 4,700 mg per day.

Although there are many sources of potassium in the produce aisle, potatoes are among the very best. Not only do potatoes rank highest for potassium among the 20 top-selling fruits and vegetables, but they are also the most affordable source of this key nutrient, providing significantly better nutritional value per dollar than most other raw vegetables and fruits. In fact, at just 110 calories, one medium-size (5.3 ounce) skin-on potato has more potassium than a banana, provides almost half the daily value of vitamin C and is sodium-, fat- and cholesterol-free. For more potato information and healthy potato recipe ideas, visit www.potatogoodness.com.


Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

report abuse...

Express yourself:

We're glad to give readers a forum to express their points of view on issues important to this community. That forum is the “Letters to the Editor.” Letters to the editor may be submitted directly to The Times-Independent through this link and will be published in the print edition of the newspaper. All letters must be the original work of the letter writer – form letters will not be accepted. All letters must include the actual first and last name of the letter writer, the writer’s address, city and state and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be accepted.

Letters may not exceed 400 words in length, must be regarding issues of general interest to the community, and may not include personal attacks, offensive language, ethnic or racial slurs, or attacks on personal or religious beliefs. Letters should focus on a single issue. Letters that proselytize or focus on theological debates will not be published. During political campaigns, The Times-Independent will not publish letters supporting or opposing any local candidate. Thank you letters are generally not accepted for publication unless the letter has a public purpose. Thank you letters dealing with private matters that compliment or complain about a business or individual will not be published. Nor will letters listing the names of individuals and/or businesses that supported a cause or event. Thank you letters about good Samaritan acts will be considered at the discretion of the newspaper.