Five lawn care tips and projects to complete before winter
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Oct 17, 2013 | 64177 views | 0 0 comments | 136 136 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(BPT) - With the autumn season in full swing, there's no better time to watch leaves change colors, enjoy a hayride with family and friends, and indulge in a cup of hot apple cider. But, did you know it's also the perfect time to prepare your backyard for winter?

Fall is an important time of year to give your lawn proper care, so it can survive the harsh winter months ahead. So before you put your tools in hibernation, consider these five lawn and garden projects from Troy-Bilt, a leading manufacturer of outdoor power equipment, to help your lawn flourish come springtime:

1. Leaf removal - During the fall, leaves cover your lawn in what seems like the blink of an eye. A leaf blower is an easy tool to use and can help you move all your debris to one place for quick cleanup. Keep in mind, it's best to either blow all leaves toward the center of your yard to create one big pile, or start at the edge of your lawn and blow leaves in the same direction.

2. Restore soil - Add beneficial nutrients, soil bacteria and microorganisms to next year's garden by recycling pulled annuals, leaves, grass clippings, and leftover fruits and vegetables into an organic compost. Your homemade compost will help you get a jumpstart on your spring lawn and garden efforts, and increase soil richness for plants and flowers.

3. Prune - Since trees and shrubs lose leaves in the fall, it is easier to spot and prune diseased or dying branches. To prevent disease, prune branches that grow back toward the center of the tree, or cross and rub against each other. However, do not remove unreasonably large branches since exposed stubs can cause health problems for trees and shrubs.

4. Lawn mulch - Give your lawn the strength it needs to survive the winter with nutrient-heavy mulch. An easy way to do this is by using a mulching lawn mower or a chipper shredder to mulch leaves and spread a thin layer over your lawn. The nutrients and organic matter absorbed into the ground will contribute to your lawn's overall strength and growth in the spring. Plus, mulching is great for preventing weeds, stopping erosion and compaction.

5. Weed control - Just like other plants, weeds prepare for winter by storing food in their roots. To remove stubborn weeds, pull or dig weeds out of the ground or use a homemade weed-control solution, such as five parts white vinegar, two parts water and one part dish soap, and then reseed the spots to prevent regrowth.

Fall will be over before you know it, so get your yard ready for the cold days ahead by doing the legwork now and visiting www.troybilt.com for all your fall lawn care needs. You'll be glad you did when spring is in full bloom.

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