Assisted living homes planned for Moab
by Steve Kadel
Staff Writer
May 16, 2013 | 2537 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The assisted living housing units proposed for Moab by Bee Hive Homes range in size from 182 to 204 square feet and include private bathroom facilities. This architect’s drawing shows the basic layout of the proposed facility.
Image courtesy of Bee Hive Homes
The assisted living housing units proposed for Moab by Bee Hive Homes range in size from 182 to 204 square feet and include private bathroom facilities. This architect’s drawing shows the basic layout of the proposed facility. Image courtesy of Bee Hive Homes
slideshow


A private company based in Idaho intends to build two 16-unit assisted living homes next to the Grand Center.

The Canyonlands Healthcare Special Service District board of directors voted unanimously Monday, May 13, to sell 2.5 acres of land to Bee Hive Homes, which is headquartered in Boise. The sale price is $60,000 per acre.

Bee Hive operates 150 assisted living homes in 15 states, including 50 in Utah, owner Dennis Toland said during a presentation to the board.

“We would love to purchase this month or in June and be ready to go,” he said, adding that financing has already been arranged.

Toland said Bee Hive’s plan is to build one home as soon as possible and a second home on the site in two to four years. The facilities would be staffed by certified nursing assistants, with a nurse on call 24 hours, Toland said.

The level of care would range from minimal for those who can walk with little trouble to increased help for residents who are still ambulatory but need assistance getting in and out of chairs, Toland said. Clients with memory loss can be cared for with even more supervision, he said.

Each resident would have a private room and bath. Staff would prepare meals three times a day, Toland said.

Monthly prices range from $2,100 for those needing minimal care to $2,800 for less ambulatory residents and $3,300 or $3,400 for those with memory loss, he said. Toland emphasized the prices include everything except residents’ medications and clothing.

“We’ve stayed small on purpose,” he said of the size of homes.

Toland said they choose rural areas because people in smaller towns generally want to remain in their communities. He said the company is about to break ground on a facility in Grand Junction, Colo., and while researching the need in that town he talked to former Moab residents there who would prefer to be in Moab.

“I met several families over there who want to come home,” Toland said.

Bee Hive currently operates a three-year-old facility in Price.

Toland said funding for the Moab project comes from three sources: 40 percent from a federal Small Business Administration loan, 40 percent from a bank loan, and 20 percent from the company’s own revenue.

Special service district board chairwoman Joey Allred said the next step is to have the property surveyed. An appraisal already has been completed.

Allred anticipates the sale proceeding quickly.

“They are ready to pay us and start,” she said.


Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

report abuse...

Express yourself:

We're glad to give readers a forum to express their points of view on issues important to this community. That forum is the “Letters to the Editor.” Letters to the editor may be submitted directly to The Times-Independent through this link and will be published in the print edition of the newspaper. All letters must be the original work of the letter writer – form letters will not be accepted. All letters must include the actual first and last name of the letter writer, the writer’s address, city and state and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be accepted.

Letters may not exceed 400 words in length, must be regarding issues of general interest to the community, and may not include personal attacks, offensive language, ethnic or racial slurs, or attacks on personal or religious beliefs. Letters should focus on a single issue. Letters that proselytize or focus on theological debates will not be published. During political campaigns, The Times-Independent will not publish letters supporting or opposing any local candidate. Thank you letters are generally not accepted for publication unless the letter has a public purpose. Thank you letters dealing with private matters that compliment or complain about a business or individual will not be published. Nor will letters listing the names of individuals and/or businesses that supported a cause or event. Thank you letters about good Samaritan acts will be considered at the discretion of the newspaper.