national news

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announces a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire beginning Friday between Israel and Hamas, in New Delhi, India, Friday Aug. 1, 2014. During the 72-hour cease-fire there will be negotiations on a more durable truce in the 24-day-old Gaza war, the United States and United Nations announced. (AP Photo/Lucas Jackson, Pool)The chief U.S. diplomat demands Hamas "immediately" release a captive Israeli soldier.


2014-08-01 09:43:07 -0600

Various models of motorcycles are shown at Harley-Davidson of Frederick in Frederick Maryland(Reuters) - Harley-Davidson Inc is recalling more than 3,000 motorcycles to fix an ignition switch issue that can cause the bikes to stall and crash, the U.S. National Highway Transportation Safety Administration said on Friday. The U.S. motorcycle maker informed NHTSA that excessive engine vibrations could trigger the issue, which it said affects 3,361 of its 2014 FXDL Dyna Low Rider motorcycles. This is the second big recall Harley-Davidson has been forced to make this summer, typically the company's peak selling season. In July, the Milwaukee-based company told NHTSA it was recalling more than 66,421 Touring and CVO Touring motorcycles from the 2014 model year to fix a problem that could cause the bike's front wheels to lock up and crash.


2014-08-01 09:40:21 -0600

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, file photo, Chet Kanojia, founder and CEO of television-over-the-Internet service Aereo, Inc., shows a tablet displaying his company's technology, in New York. After the Supreme Court's ruling against the company, Aereo is now using the high court's own language to force broadcasters to treat it just like other cable TV companies. In Aereo’s view, that means broadcasters must license its signals to Aereo under a 1976 copyright law. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Aereo Inc, the video streaming company that suspended service after the U.S. Supreme Court found it violated copyrights of television broadcasters, has urged a federal judge to let it operate like a cable system, saying it likely would not otherwise survive. In a Thursday night filing with the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, the start-up backed by billionaire Barry Diller said it needed emergency help because it could not continue incurring "staggering costs" without having revenue come in, and required "some time" to make the necessary technological changes. "Unless it is able to resume operations in the immediate future, the company will likely not survive," Aereo said. "The company is figuratively bleeding to death." Bruce Keller, a partner at Debevoise & Plimpton representing the broadcasters, declined to comment on Friday.


2014-08-01 09:16:49 -0600