national news

In this Jan. 5, 2015, file courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, in Boston. Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tsarnaev have asked a judge three times to move his trial out of Massachusetts because of the emotional impact of the deadly attack. Three times, the judge has refused. On Thursday, Feb. 19, Tsarnaev’s defense team will ask a federal appeals court to take the decision out of the hands of O’Toole Jr. and order him to move the trial. They insist that Tsarnaev cannot find a fair and impartial jury in Massachusetts because too many people believe he’s guilty and many have personal connections to the marathon or the bombings. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)The case against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev begins today after nearly two months of jury selection.


2015-03-04 02:12:09 -0700

Supreme Court weighs new conservative attack on ObamacareBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court began hearing arguments on Wednesday on a second major legal attack on President Barack Obama's healthcare law, with conservative challengers taking aim at a pivotal part of the statute that authorizes tax subsidies to help people afford insurance. On a chilly, damp, cloudy day in the U.S. capital, about a couple hundred demonstrators mostly from pro-Obamacare forces including labor unions, a nurses group, Planned Parenthood and women's groups gathered on the sidewalk in front of the white marble columned courthouse ahead of the argument. Some demonstrators chanted, "Healthcare under attack, stand up, fight back." Some of the signs said "Don't take my care" and "8 + million could lose coverage." One of the demonstrators, Pittsburgh nurse Michelle Boyle, said it is important that Americans who need help buying health insurance continue to get it under this law.


2015-03-04 08:13:18 -0700

Lawyer: Ferguson officer Darren Wilson, who shot Michael Brown, resigns due to threats to departmentSeven months after one of its white officers fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old, the Ferguson, Missouri, Police Department’s own findings of what transpired remain under wraps. Excessive force and possible civil rights violations by the suburban St. Louis department have been the focus of a Justice Department investigation since Darren Wilson shot Michael Brown Jr. multiple times last August.


2015-03-04 01:58:08 -0700