business
‘Starry, Starry Night’ theme announced for 2014 Moab Electric Light Parade
The Moab Electric Light Parade will take place Dec. 6, and last week the Moab Area Chamber of Commerce announced that the 2014 theme will be “Starry, Starry Night.” The theme was selected by last y...
Nov 06, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 223 223 recommendations | email to a friend
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Grand County Credit Union looking to open Green River location soon
Ever since Key Bank closed its branch in Green River in June, residents of that community have been left without a financial institution. But the Grand County Credit Union (GCCU) will soon be allev...
Nov 06, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 220 220 recommendations | email to a friend
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Local doctor donates vasectomy fees to non-profit groups
A local physician has contributed approximately $15,000 to local charities by collecting donations from the recipients of no-scalpel vasectomies performed at his Moab clinic. Through his program, D...
Oct 11, 2012 | 0 0 comments | 1105 1105 recommendations | email to a friend
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New guide service aims to fill gap in backcountry offerings
A new backcountry guide service that specializes in custom journeys for small groups and families has opened in Moab. Deep Desert Expeditions, founded by Moab resident Mike Coronella, aims to fill ...
Aug 05, 2010 | 0 0 comments | 1129 1129 recommendations | email to a friend
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  • Second Lives: Sara Melnicoff
    by Charli Engelhorn
    staff writer
    07.12.12 - 10:29 am

  • <b><i>Breaking new ground...<br></b></i>
Larson and Company representatives break ground Aug. 19 in preparation for the construction of the certified public accountant firm’s new offices at 295 South 400 East. Local elected officials and representatives from the Moab Area Chamber of Commerce joined the company for the event. Officials for Larson and Company, which employees 10 people in Moab, said they expect to relocate from their current offices at 880 S. Main St. in mid-January. Pictured (from left): Karen Ballantyne, Deena Whitman, Gorden Beh, company founder Dennis Larson, Ryon Jones, Greg Denning, Rochell Denney, Sheree Maughan and Shannon Whitney.
    Breaking new ground...
    Larson and Company representatives break ground Aug. 19 in preparation for the construction of the certified public accountant firm’s new offices at 295 South 400 East. Local elected officials and representatives from the Moab Area Chamber of Commerce joined the company for the event. Officials for Larson and Company, which employees 10 people in Moab, said they expect to relocate from their current offices at 880 S. Main St. in mid-January. Pictured (from left): Karen Ballantyne, Deena Whitman, Gorden Beh, company founder Dennis Larson, Ryon Jones, Greg Denning, Rochell Denney, Sheree Maughan and Shannon Whitney.
    slideshow

    national news

    Trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shortly after the market opened in New YorkSlowing growth in emerging markets and currency fluctuations in anticipation of a U.S. interest rate hike may push third-quarter revenue and earnings estimates lower this month. Estimates have already fallen for 9 out of 10 of the benchmark index's sectors so far this year, according to Thomson Reuters data. This could happen fairly quickly," said Tim Ghriskey, chief investment officer of Solaris Group in Bedford Hills, New York.


    2015-09-04 19:33:44 -0600

    People browse booths at a military veterans' job fair in CarsonBy Lucia Mutikani WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. job growth slowed in August, but the unemployment rate dropped to a near 7-1/2-year low and wages accelerated, keeping alive prospects of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike later this month. Nonfarm payrolls increased 173,000 last month after an upwardly revised gain of 245,000 in July, the Labor Department said on Friday. August's gain was the smallest in five months as the factory sector lost the most jobs since July 2013.


    2015-09-04 14:11:52 -0600

    Federal Reserve building in WashingtonBy Jonathan Spicer and Jason Lange NEW YORK/RICHMOND, Va. (Reuters) - The latest U.S. jobs report was not definitively good or bad enough to help the Federal Reserve decide whether to raise interest rates later this month, leaving the decision hanging on volatility in financial markets over the next couple of weeks. The economy added 173,000 jobs in August, quite a bit fewer than expected. With global financial markets reeling over the last two weeks over fears of a Chinese economic slowdown, the report is probably the best and last direct reading on the economy before Fed officials consider hiking rates at a Sept. 16-17 meeting.


    2015-09-04 13:16:11 -0600